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  • Anesthesia techniques and commonly used anesthetic agents.​ Module will be available for 120 days from date of purchase.

    This module includes anesthesia techniques and commonly used anesthetic agents.

    Linda Ziolkowski

    MSN RN CPAN

  • Special anatomical and physiological considerations unique to the pediatric, geriatric and pregnant patient. Module will be available for 120 days from date of purchase.

    This module includes special anatomical and physiological considerations unique to the pediatric, geriatric and pregnant patient.

    Linda Ziolkowski, MSN, RN, CPAN

  • Safety as a priority in the perianesthesia setting.​ Module will be available for 120 days from date of purchase.

    This module will present safety as a priority in the perianesthesia setting.

    Linda Beagley

    MS BSN RN CPAN FASPAN

  • Care of the pregnant patient in PACU.​ Module will be available for 120 days from date of purchase.

    This module includes potential complications and emergencies after anesthesia.

    Jacque Crosson

    DNP RN CPAN FASPAN

  • Care of the pregnant patient in PACU.​ Module will be available for 120 days from date of purchase.

    This session will present care of the pregnant patient in PACU. 

    Linda Beagley

    MS BSN RN CPAN FASPAN

  • Perianesthesia nurses, particularly those who educate patients before and after surgery, have an excellent opportunity to educate patients and families who are discharged to home after surgery.

    Authors: Jan Odom-Forren, PhD, RN, CPAN, FASPAN, FAAN, Joni Brady, DNP, RN-BC, CAPA, Paul A. Sloan, MD
    Opioid overdose deaths and opioid use disorders are a crisis in the United States and other western countries around the globe. Opioid prescriptions more than doubled after the turn of the century, particularly for postoperative patients. Unfortunately, many who have abused opioids were able to obtain those opioids from friends or family who had held on to prescribed, but unused opioids. One method to manage and decrease the opportunity for unused opioids to become black-market opioids is to educate patients and families regarding the safe use, safe storage, and proper disposal of unused prescription opioids. Perianesthesia nurses, particularly those who educate patients before and after surgery, have an excellent opportunity to educate patients and families who are discharged to home after surgery.

  • Discuss priorities for the perianesthesia nurse when caring for the ECT patient.​ Module will be available for 120 days from date of purchase.

    This module will discuss priorities for the perianesthesia nurse when caring for the ECT patient.

    Nancy O'Malley

    MA BSN RN CPAN CAPA FASPAN

  • The purpose of this article is to review current evidence to guide perianesthesia nurses in the care of a patient with a central vascular access device (CVAD).

    Authors: Emily K. Jarding, Major, USAF, NC, MS, AGCNS-BC, MHAMary Beth Flynn Makic, PhD, RN, CCNS, FAAN, FNAP, FCNS
    Central line–associated bloodstream infections occur not only in the intensive care unit but also the non–intensive care units of the hospital. The purpose of this article is to review current evidence to guide perianesthesia nurses in the care of a patient with a central vascular access device (CVAD). The CVAD bundle focuses on five key elements: hand hygiene, maximal sterile barrier, chlorhexidine antiseptic, catheter site selection, and daily evaluation of the need for the device. Once the CVAD is placed, evidence-based care and maintenance are the responsibility of the nurse. Ensuring proper maintenance and care of a CVAD falls within nursing practice and interventions can significantly reduce the patient's risk of central line–associated bloodstream infection. The single most crucial step a nurse can take to help prevent central line–associated bloodstream infections is performing proper hand hygiene. Other interventions focus on dressing management, bathing practices, access of intravenous infusion sets, blood draws, and management of port line occlusions. Familiarity and adoption of best practice interventions in the maintenance and care of patients with CVADs will help the perianesthesia nurse protect patients and prevent harm.

  • Discuss priorities for the perianesthesia nurse when caring for the neurological perianesthesia patient.​ Module will be available for 120 days from date of purchase.

    This module will discuss priorities for the perianesthesia nurse when caring for the ECT patient.

    Myrna Mamaril

    DNP RN NEA-BC CPAN CAPA FAAN FASPAN

  • The purpose of this quality improvement project was to develop a competency-based orientation (CBO) protocol based on the American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses Nursing Standards and CBO for perianesthesia nurses.

    Authors: Helen C. Fong, DNP, RN, CPAN, PHN, FASPAN, Janet L. Sohal, DNP, RN, NEA-BC,Jacque A. Crosson, DNP, RN, CPAN, FASPAN, Cristina Hendrix, DNS, GNP-BC, FAAN
    Purpose:  The purpose of this quality improvement project was to develop a competency-based orientation (CBO) protocol based on the American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses Nursing Standards and CBO for perianesthesia nurses.
    Design:  Feasibility study with pre–post survey design.
    Methods:  A CBO protocol that included nursing care workflows for 11 common surgical cases was developed and used in orienting newly hired perianesthesia nurses. Newly hired nurses completed a pre–post self-assessment on their level of competency in caring for surgical patients.
    Findings:  Using Wilcoxon signed rank test, improved competency was found in all service areas except for pediatric care.
    Conclusions:  Nursing competency in the perianesthesia area is critical in fulfilling one's role as a nurse. A robust CBO protocol for the perianesthesia nurse is important when integrating an employee into the organization and preparing the nurse for success.